Marine Debris

Marine Debris


The issue of marine debris is increasingly critical, and many countries bordering the ocean have considered it a significant environmental issue and been seeking solutions.

More than 80% of marine debris originates from terrestrial sources, with human activities, the use and improper disposal of plastic products accounting for the majority, and a minor percentage from vessels or marine aquaculture discharges. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) estimates that 10 to 20 million tons of plastic ends up in the ocean each year, causing $13 billion in damage to marine ecology. According to data published in the journal Science by American scholar Jambeck, coastal countries around the world produce 275 million tons of waste plastic each year, and it is estimated that between 4.8 and 12.7 million tons go into the ocean. Marine debris not only affects the marine habitat environment, economic development and human activities, but also produces chemicals and microplastics that can be transmitted through the food chain, endangering the lives of marine organisms and human health.

In order to solve the problem of plastic pollution, UNEP held a transnational conference in Geneva, Switzerland in 2019, proposed to strengthen the control of plastic waste export trades. In June of the same year, the Osaka Blue Ocean Vision was adopted at the G20 Summit, with the goal of “reduce additional pollution by Marine Plastic Litter to zero by 2050”, it is expected to reduce the impact on marine life and the environment through international cooperation in response to marine pollution problems.

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